OnJugger Episode 3. Refereeing, Rules and Sanctions

In this episode of OnJugger we deal with one of the greatest problems facing jugger at the moment. The quality of refereeing, the exploitation of rules and the knowledge that there are no sanctions so malicious players can do what they want with impunity.

Our panel of (Stumpy) Dave Edwards, Jonas Kopka, Kate Foley, (Hot) Dave Keaveney and hosted by Mark Hill discuss and dissect all of the topics. And explain the new Irish reffing system which is being trialled at the moment.

We hope you enjoy the show and please comment, like, share and follow! We need your support!

Infographics

Here are all the info-graphics from the podcast. We thought we would release these as well to help people understand the new Irish reffing system with sanctions that we are trialling at the moment.

Important to note this system and sanctions are heavily drawn from the current German and Spanish systems with our own new ideas and sanctions added. Which are in turn drawn from rugby sevens and our own experiences playing jugger for the past 13 years.

Let us know your thoughts here or on our Facebook page.

If the images are displayed to small on your device just click on them and they should download in their full size.

Sanctions Overview

Sanctions Breakdown

Warnings Breakdown

Warnings Breakdown

5 (8) Stone Penalty Breakdown

5 (8) Stone Penalty

Yellow Card Breakdown

Yellow Card Breakdown

Red Card Breakdown

Red Card Breakdown

Current German Refereeing System

The main referees are usually the most experienced players. They stand at the mid points of the pitch and watch channel 1 and 4. The goal referees are usually the least experieneced and stand at opposite corners of the pitch. And they watch channel 2 and 3. But after the inital run in most of gameplay occurs in channels 2 and 3. Which means you have the least experienced players refereeing most of the action.

Current German Refereeing System

Irish Refereeing System

With the new irish refreeing system the main referees (usually the most experienced players) are placed at the opposite ends of the pitch. And they watch channels 2 and 3.
The side referees (usually the least experienced players) stand at the mid points of the pitch and watch channels 1 and 4.
We have done this because after the intial run in most of the action happens in channels 2 and 3. So now you will have the most experienced referees watching the most amount of gameplay.

Current Irish Refereeing System

Referee Discussion Breakdown

Basically this is a system on how referees communicate to players and the other referees durning a in game rule discussion.

Referee Discussion Breakdown

The Counter

Added rules for the counter (time keeper)

The Counter

Current Refereeing Tournament Structures

Current Refereeing Tournament Structures

Current Refereeing Tournament Structures

Refereeing Tournament Strucutures Suggestion

Refereeing Tournament Strucutures Suggestion

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